How does the BBC select its expert academic commentators?

The Commons Select Committee on Business, Innovation & Skills is currently looking at the emerging shape of work in modern Britain. As someone interested in skills and learning, I am keeping an eye on their inquiry, and am looking forward to its report. Their work was featured this morning on the BBC’s flagship radio news programme Today, which interviewed the Committee chair and an expert commentator by the name of Jeremy Baker.

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The interview with Baker created something of a Twitter storm. Introduced as ‘a retail analyst and affiliate professor at ESCP Europe Business School’, Baker proceeded to harp on about the notion of employment rights for entry-level workers, including trainees, which he repeatedly derided as ‘French’ and ‘middle class’.

Needless to say, Baker’s ideas were promptly rejected by Iain Wright, MP, who chairs the Select Committee. But given the rather peculiar nature of his comments, it seems reasonable to put the question: who is Jeffrey Baker, and what is his expertise? I did a bit of internet searching, and the results were mildly revealing.

First, the ESCP itself. ECSP is a private higher education institution, active in and recognised by a number of European states, with its origins in Paris. It enjoys a good reputation, and achieves well in international rankings of business schools.

The ESCP website lists Baker as an ‘affiliate professor’. What this means depends on the institution and individual; often, it is an appointment that is approved at departmental level, for someone whom the department wishes to contribute teaching or research.

The ESCP website tells us very little about Baker’s expertise. The one publication it mentions is his book Tolstoy’s Bicycle, described as ‘a creative look at career paths’, but which seems to be a popular compendium of high achievers and their ages, published in 1982. His current research is not listed, nor are his publications. A search on Google Scholar didn’t shed any further light on his expertise.

I have no idea whether the Today programme tried elsewhere and was turned down, or whether Baker or the ESCP put his name forward. But if you want an up-to-date expert on developments in the contemporary labour market, Baker doesn’t seem an obvious first choice.

Perhaps someone chuntering on about the French makes for good radio. But for those of us attempting to promote ideas of research informed policy, this morning’s interview was a step back.

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One thought on “How does the BBC select its expert academic commentators?

  1. I heard him, a moron …  _____________ Michael Burns   To listen to my songs and tunes, go to http://michaelburns1.com/

    From: thelearningprofessor To: aardvarkgs@btinternet.com Sent: Tuesday, 7 June 2016, 10:22 Subject: [New post] 4190 #yiv5050580534 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv5050580534 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv5050580534 a.yiv5050580534primaryactionlink:link, #yiv5050580534 a.yiv5050580534primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv5050580534 a.yiv5050580534primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv5050580534 a.yiv5050580534primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv5050580534 WordPress.com | thelearningprofessor posted: “The Commons Select Committee on Employment is currently looking at the emerging shape of work in modern Britain. As someone interested in skills and learning, I am keeping an eye on their inquiry, and am looking forward to its report. Their work was featu” | |

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