The coming crisis of adult learning in Scotland

The next two or three weeks will see local councils setting their budgets, in a context of significant reductions in overall spending. This will be a particularly tough year for non-statutory services such as community learning and development (CLD), which encompasses most youth work and adult learning.

CLD has already been reduced in many councils, thanks partly to a government commitment not to increase council tax rates. One result is that there are far fewer experienced professionals in the system, and accordingly fewer people with the knowledge, connections and passion to lobby on CLD’s behalf. The early signs for the coming year though are deeply troubling.

Moray Council has already agreed its budget http://www.moray.gov.uk/moray_standard/page_119975.html, which includes cuts to ESOL of £18,000 in 2019-20 and a further £23,000 in the following year, along with ‘removal’ of its Essential Skills (adult literacy and numeracy) provision. Moray says it is adopting an assets-based approach in these areas, though what that means is so far unclear.

South Lanarkshire meanwhile has justified proposed cuts to employability programmes by the use of digital and online resources, which “will allow more clients to meet their needs through self-service routes at a reduced cost”.

No one is arguing that adult learning is unpopular and uncalled by local residents. On the contrary: when North Lanarkshire Council consulted residents over its proposed cuts, it found that from a long list of 47 options, the restructuring of CLD was second most disliked. And as Scotland’s Learning Partnership has repeatedly emphasised, the evidence of adult learning’s public benefits is now overwhelming.

CLD has a proud tradition and has been a distinctive part of Scotland’s education provision since the 1970s. It has also provided credibility and a learning infrastructure for ventures into community participation in other policy areas. And as other providers have withdrawn or closed down through earlier budget cuts, so CLD has come to serve as the last major form of public adult learning in Scotland. The next weeks are, then, critical.

Brexit and lifelong learning after the European Structural Funds

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Withdrawal from the European Union is going to be complicated, not least for the future of adult learning. I’ve written previously about the relationship between Brexit and adult learning, but so far I’ve not really given much thought to the role of the Structural Funds, and in particular the European Social Fund, which provides considerable financial support for adult learning across the UK.

For the period 2014-2020, the UK was allocated €3.5 billion. While it is co-ordinated by the Department of Work and Pensions, much of it is handed over to other bodies for allocation; these include the Skills Funding Agency, the Big Lottery Fund, and the Scottish Government. And while ESF funding is allocated to all regions of the UK, it is worth noting that it is disproportionately sizeable and important in Wales.

The UK’s operational plan for ESF spending between 2014 and 2020 is available online here. Its priority areas explicitly include “activities to inspire and encourage lifelong learning and the consequentbenefits of learning”, with a particular focus on funding provision that promotes employability but does not duplicate existing provision or substitute for private funding.

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From the DWP’s Operational Programme for ESF 2014-2020

The activities supported by the ESF in the UK are remarkably broad, encompassing the Learning and Work Institute’s Festival of Learning, a range of programmes for women workers, and the governmment’s traineeship and apprenticeship programmes. And, above all, ESF helps to fund literacy, numeracy and English learning.

As for the future, the current funding round doesn’t expire until 2020, so there is time to prepare. In thinking ahead to whatever succeeds the Structural Funds, we need to make certain that adult learning is not forgotten. Ideally, the successor programe(s) in Britain will be more flexible and more learner centred, and less bureaucratically cumbersome, than the ESF and ERDF.

As for the future of the Stuctural Funds without the UK, my best guess is that the design work for the 2021-2028 programme has already started in outline. The real work of developing a draft will therefore take place with no UK contribution; and it will finally be negotiated by a European Commission and European Parliament that will look very different in political complexion and priorities to the bodies that agreed the 2014-2020 programme. I’m inclined to doubt whether the post-2020 programme will, then, just be ‘more of the same’.

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Social capital and ethnic diversity at work: the role of language learning

fireI’m extremely interested in the relationship between social capital and ethnic diversity. Put simply, the standard hypothesis is that we find it easier to build trusting relationships with people who share similar characteristics to ourselves. Robert Putnam, the doyen of social capital scholars, wrote in 2007 that residents in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods tend to ‘hunker down’, a contention that he supported with abundant evidence (his article is available here).

And now along comes a rather good study of linguistic diversity in the workplace. People use language in the workplace not just to communicate about the tasks they have to complete, but also to build bridges with one another through small talk, gossip and humour, and displaying trust by disclosing ‘private’ information about themselves.

While linguistic diversity might not disrupt work that involves routine and simple tasks, this study shows that it has wider effects for relationships between different groups of workers. The author, Frederik Thuesen, concludes that ‘in low-skill workplaces characterised by linguistic diversity, communication problems have a small impact on the completion of work tasks but a large impact on social relations’.

So talk really matters.Thuesen concludes that employers and trade unions can and should do more to promote language learning, as well as providing intercultural training for majority workers. He also quotes the example of a supermarket firm which used Facebook to promote inter-cultural dialogue among cashiers. And of course government can help create a supportive environment, not least by promoting language learning and ensuring the quality of provision.

The abstract for Thueson's article

The abstract for Thueson’s article

Of course, workers themselves can also intervene, for better or for worse. I certainly don’t assume that migrants and minorities are passive victims of everything society throws at them; I’ve written before about the attempt to build a mosque that is designed to promote trust and remove suspicion, a development that I very much welcome. But above all it is for the host society, and particularly its government, to ensure that those who come from other cultures are able to contribute effectively, and to build bonds with their new compatriots.

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